My oedipus complex essay

While Oedipus did not realize he had committed both patricide and incest, his disturbing dreams (which were famously analyzed by Sigmund Freud in Interpretation of Dreams, in which the phrase "Oedipus Complex" was coined) were his subconscious's way of telling him something was terribly wrong. ... Both Oedipus and myself are victims of parental abuse by jealous parents. Laius's reaction to what is only a dream is extreme as my mother trying to see me to my children's bed. ... Like myself (and most likely Oedipus), Richard had been denied the maternal bonding he craved, which ...

As a result he creates Mrs. Left and Mrs. Right to discuss his problems and to fight boredom with. The day his father came home from the war everything changed for Larry. He finds his father altogether less interesting when he arrives home. His father is not wearing his uniform and does not have any souvenirs from the war. At this point in the story the reader can actually understand why the story is called "My Oedipus Complex." Larry begins to show signs of a severe case of the complex. It is at this point where the competition for attention begins. This is the first time in his life without having the full attention of his mother and for the first time in his life he feels neglected. Larry does not know that his mother has to share her love and affection between him and his father. He also does not realize that his father is having a hard time right now finding a job to support the family. Larry develops a hatred for his father because of this. He is constantly waking his father up and fighting with him. Larry even believes that he will end up marrying his mother to get her away from his father. However, soon after his father's return from the war a new son is born into the family. After this event Larry changes his focus from his father to his new brother, Sonny. He now had to compete with his younger brother for his mother's attention. This is a competition that he will not win. The birth of his brother in the end will bring him closer to the man he "hated" for so long. Sonny consumed all of his mother's attention; she had not time for Larry and her husband. Larry is confined in his own little world throughout most of the story. He is a very naïve and selfish character. He has no sense of what is going on around him.

Oedipus’s swiftness and confidence continue to the very end of Oedipus the King . We see him interrogate Creon, call for Tiresias, threaten to banish Tiresias and Creon, call for the servant who escaped the attack on Laius, call for the shepherd who brought him to Corinth, rush into the palace to stab out his own eyes, and then demand to be exiled. He is constantly in motion, seemingly trying to keep pace with his fate, even as it goes well beyond his reach. In Oedipus at Colonus, however, Oedipus seems to have begun to accept that much of his life is out of his control. He spends most of his time sitting rather than acting. Most poignant are lines 825–960, where Oedipus gropes blindly and helplessly as Creon takes his children from him. In order to get them back, Oedipus must rely wholly on Theseus.

Sadeq Rahimi has noted a common relationship between the uncanny and direct or metaphorical visual references, which he explains in terms of basic processes of ego development, specifically as developed by Jacques Lacan 's theory of the mirror stage . Rahimi presents a wide range of evidence from various contexts to demonstrate how uncanny experiences are typically associated with themes and metaphors of vision, blindness, mirrors and other optical tropes. He also presents historical evidence showing strong presence of ocular and specular themes and associations in the literary and psychological tradition out of which the notion of ‘the uncanny’ emerged. According to Rahimi, instances of the uncanny like doppelgangers , ghosts , Déjà vu , alter egos , self-alienations and split personhoods, phantoms, twins , living dolls, etc. share two important features: that they are closely tied with visual tropes, and that they are variations on the theme of doubling of the ego. [11]

Creon's decree to leave Polyneices unburied in itself makes a bold statement about what it means to be a citizen, and what constitutes abdication of citizenship. It was the firmly kept custom of the Greeks that each city was responsible for the burial of its citizens. Herodotus discussed how members of each city would collect their own dead after a large battle to bury them. [19] In Antigone , it is therefore natural that the people of Thebes did not bury the Argives, but very striking that Creon prohibited the burial of Polyneices. Since he is a citizen of Thebes, it would have been natural for the Thebans to bury him. Creon is telling his people that Polyneices has distanced himself from them, and that they are prohibited from treating him as a fellow-citizen and burying him as is the custom for citizens.

My oedipus complex essay

my oedipus complex essay

Sadeq Rahimi has noted a common relationship between the uncanny and direct or metaphorical visual references, which he explains in terms of basic processes of ego development, specifically as developed by Jacques Lacan 's theory of the mirror stage . Rahimi presents a wide range of evidence from various contexts to demonstrate how uncanny experiences are typically associated with themes and metaphors of vision, blindness, mirrors and other optical tropes. He also presents historical evidence showing strong presence of ocular and specular themes and associations in the literary and psychological tradition out of which the notion of ‘the uncanny’ emerged. According to Rahimi, instances of the uncanny like doppelgangers , ghosts , Déjà vu , alter egos , self-alienations and split personhoods, phantoms, twins , living dolls, etc. share two important features: that they are closely tied with visual tropes, and that they are variations on the theme of doubling of the ego. [11]

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