Respiratory system research papers

You use your eyes to see, your ears to hear and your muscles to do the heavy lifting. Well, sort of. In fact, most body parts are far more complicated than that, while some seem to have no business being inside there at all. Start the Quiz 0 of 10 questions complete Ready for Med School? Test Your Body Smarts You use your eyes to see, your ears to hear and your muscles to do the heavy lifting. Well, sort of. In fact, most body parts are far more complicated than that, while some seem to have no business being inside there at all. 0 of questions complete Start Over | More Quizzes

With each inhalation, air fills a large portion of the millions of alveoli. In a process called diffusion (pronounced: dih-FYOO-zhun), oxygen moves from the alveoli to the blood through the capillaries (tiny blood vessels, pronounced: KAP-uh-lair-eez) that line the alveolar walls. Once in the bloodstream, oxygen gets picked up by a molecule called hemoglobin (pronounced: HEE-muh-glo-bun) in the red blood cells. This oxygen-rich blood then flows back to the heart, which pumps it through the arteries to oxygen-hungry tissues throughout the body.

Larynx
The larynx , also known as the voice box, is a short section of the airway that connects the laryngopharynx and the trachea. The larynx is located in the anterior portion of the neck, just inferior to the hyoid bone and superior to the trachea. Several cartilage structures make up the larynx and give it its structure. The epiglottis is one of the cartilage pieces of the larynx and serves as the cover of the larynx during swallowing. Inferior to the epiglottis is the thyroid cartilage , which is often referred to as the Adam’s apple as it is most commonly enlarged and visible in adult males. The thyroid holds open the anterior end of the larynx and protects the vocal folds. Inferior to the thyroid cartilage is the ring-shaped cricoid cartilage which holds the larynx open and supports its posterior end. In addition to cartilage, the larynx contains special structures known as vocal folds, which allow the body to produce the sounds of speech and singing. The vocal folds are folds of mucous membrane that vibrate to produce vocal sounds. The tension and vibration speed of the vocal folds can be changed to change the pitch that they produce.

Respiratory system research papers

respiratory system research papers

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