Using an epigraph in an essay

The One Ring possessed something of a will of its own. Its only accepted master was Sauron himself, and it would seek to leave any other bearer when it would cause the greatest harm, or when it might return to Sauron. Bilbo warned Frodo of this, and Frodo kept it on a chain so that it would not slip off unnoticed. In the end, Gollum succumbs to the malevolent influence of the ring, defies Frodo, and takes the ring for himself. While dancing with joy over the recovery of the ring, Gollum falls into the Cracks of Doom in Orodruin , where the ring is destroyed. With the destruction of the Ring, Gandalf explains that Sauron is weakened to the point that he will never be able to materialize again. [11]

Arnold and his family visit the graves of Eugene, Grandmother Spirit, and Mary. He cries for his people and himself and his loneliness. He has kind of an epiphany, though. He realizes that he really doesn't have to see himself as a person split in two. He sees that he is a part of many different tribes (he is not only an Indian, but a cartoonist, and a son, and a basketball player, and a bookworm, and so forth). Arnold knows that he is not from Wellpinit or Reardan, but that he is a multi-dimensional person. Arnold becomes multi-tribal.

Agent Wizard is a powerful application that interviews the author to ensure he is not guilty of premature submission. Once past that, the agent wizard will determine potential literary agents in the included database suited to the genre of the manuscript, location, and other criteria. From these selected agents, the author can select and place agents in three categories. The author can now print mailing labels, and collated submissions packages with attachments matched to the agents requirements with appropriate query letter salutation. All the author need do is insert the packages into envelopes, attach labels and postage, and mail. In the case where the agent accepts email, t

Excerpt Undoubtedly, one of the hottest topics in the field of OT biblical studies in recent years is the dating of the Exodus.[1] Essentially, there are two prevailing positions: the early Exodus view, which contends that the Israelite Exodus transpired during the middle of the 15th century BC, and the late Exodus view, which purports that the Israelites actually left Egypt nearly 200 years later, during the 13th century BC. On the side of the latter view, biblical archaeologists such as James Hoffmeier contend that a 13th century BC Exodus better fits the material evidence, in large part due to alleged connections between sites mentioned in the biblical text—such as the store-city of Raamses (Exod 1:11), which he asserts “is likely to be equated with the Delta capital built by and named for Ramesses II, that is, Pi-Ramesses”[2]—and excavated or identifiable sites in Egypt. Continue reading

Using an epigraph in an essay

using an epigraph in an essay

Excerpt Undoubtedly, one of the hottest topics in the field of OT biblical studies in recent years is the dating of the Exodus.[1] Essentially, there are two prevailing positions: the early Exodus view, which contends that the Israelite Exodus transpired during the middle of the 15th century BC, and the late Exodus view, which purports that the Israelites actually left Egypt nearly 200 years later, during the 13th century BC. On the side of the latter view, biblical archaeologists such as James Hoffmeier contend that a 13th century BC Exodus better fits the material evidence, in large part due to alleged connections between sites mentioned in the biblical text—such as the store-city of Raamses (Exod 1:11), which he asserts “is likely to be equated with the Delta capital built by and named for Ramesses II, that is, Pi-Ramesses”[2]—and excavated or identifiable sites in Egypt. Continue reading

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